Old Forge Pizza & Cold Cheese Pizza

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I’m always game for a road trip (especially when it involves food), so when Daniel suggested a detour into Old Forge, PA to try their pizza styles I jumped at the chance. We were armed with suggestions from NEPA Pizza Review, and off we went.  I just kind of tagged along with Daniel and his crazy list of must-try pizza places.

Northeastern Pennsylvania style pizza is unlike any I’ve ever heard of before. It reminds me of a cross of french bread pizza, Elio’s frozen pizza, and hot pockets. There are three different styles: red (tomato sauce + cheese), white (just cheese) & white stuffed crust (just white, but with a top crust of dough plus the bottom crust.
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First up was a tomato & garlic white pie at Colarusso’s. The bread dough was vaguely focaccia-y and the cheese was more of a cheese sauce. Order by the pies here.
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$8.00 for a pie, though the menu listed a higher price for white pies over tomato pies. Any way, first pie down and we were off to the next stop!
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Salerno’s was up next. It’s a dark bar right next door to a funeral home, but yay, it has its own parking lot.
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We put in the order for two cuts of stuffed white. About 20 minutes later, we got these ridiculously cheap cuts (they call them “cuts” not “slices” in NEPA). Each cut was like $1.50 or $1.75. Crazy cheap. The bottom crust was soggy, but the top crust was almost pastry-like and flaky, and the thin burnished onion on top was nice. The cheese itself was fairly flavorless and had a gluey texture.
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Third stop was Arcaro & Genell, a restaurant whose name I’m still not entirely sure how to pronounce. This was definitely the ritziest restaurant of the tour. Very clean and well maintained inside, solid tables, and I think there was even a bocce ball court out front.
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We went with a red, a white, and a white broccoli. The white at Arcaro & Genell was of the stuffed variety. This was probably my most enjoyable overall cut of the entire trip. The cheese had a little bit of mozzarella, which added some stretchy texture and salt to the cheese sauce. The crusts were fairly crisp, but not as pastry-like as Salerno’s. The broccoli was enjoyable – still a bit crunchy and fresh, plus a hearty kick of garlic.
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So cheap. It took about 15-20 or so minutes to heat up these slices. I’m guessing most folks don’t just order a cut or two.
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Revello’s – the clunker of the day.
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Anazalone Special Lager – said it was local, so I wanted to give it a try. The first sip was refreshing, but after that it was like PBR & Budweiser. Basically like metal shavings. Not my fave. Thankfully the fussman helped me with this beer.
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The long-reheat times seemed to be a thing with NEPA style cuts, but Revello’s wins for longest wait. 30 minutes from order to table, and we were one of the only tables. The cuts were gummy and easily skippable. The red slice reminded me exactly of Elio’s frozen pizza. We got a white & a white broccoli. The broccoli was gummy and mushy.
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Ghigiarelli’s was the final NEPA pizza stop.
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Hmm, wonder what they use for their sauce?
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The red cut here featured a lot of tomato flavor, but somehow they transformed canned into a refreshing & bright (not metallic) flavor. Lots of onions in the sauce as well. Took about 20 minutes for the slices to come out, which is just so crazy cheap for the amount of time a patron sits in the restaurant taking up space. Overhead must be low in PA.
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ICE CREAM BREAK
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Fro-yo, actually. And this was a small. A SMALL. And they said people complain that their smalls are TOO SMALL. What madness is this? It was close to a pint for like $2.50.
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A few hours later we were in Oneonta, just in time for a few more slices. I was initially grossed out at the thought of cold cheese on pizza, but hey, I was game to try it, and the NEPA style pizzas hadn’t been my jam, so what’s another slice or two?
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Tino’s is the alleged inventor of cold cheese pizza. The slice itself was just okay. But the cheese strands on top were way too thick and bland. Kind of like play-doh noodle thickness. It didn’t melt at all on the reheated slices, and was just a heavy addition that detracted from the slice.
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And then we strolled Oneonta’s cute main strip. The Fuss man wouldn’t indulge my request to go into the Novelty Lounge, citing depressing reviews. But dude, LOOK AT THAT SIGN! And a 23+ age limit. Sigh. Next time.
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The final slice du jour was at Sal’s, which we shared because someone who wasn’t me was starting to get full. Sigh. Fine. This was actually a much nicer iteration of cold cheese pizza. Flavorful crisp slice below, and thin shreds of salty mozzarella that melted over time into the slice. I think I’m still personally more of an extra-cheese-over-cold-cheese type gal, but this was a nice way to round out the night.

If you told me when I was a kid that I’d grow up to spend a summer eating pizza I’d have thought you were fooling me.

3 comments
  1. Beards said:

    As someone who grew up eating the pizza of Oneonta, Tino’s has never been known for stellar pizza. You should have
    tried, in addition to Sal’s, Ruffino’s, and Mama Nina’s – All part of DT Oneonta. Cold cheese seems to vary at each
    place. If you wanted “Chicago Style” pizza, there’s the Depot, a short distance away from DT,

  2. Court said:

    Best I can tell Tino’s did invent the Cold Cheese and you’re absolutely right, Sals does a much better job with pizza. For me it’s the texture difference in the cold stringy cheese and the pizza.

    Also, you didn’t miss much from the Novelty. Remind me sometime and I’ll you about it. And the 4(?) times we were asked to leave…

  3. Time to try the Corleone style pizza make only @pizza-grill.com

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